Federico
Pisciotta

www.federicopisciotta.com/


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About the Artist

Pisciotta Federico was born in Rome on 30 October 1975. He graduated in 1993 at the VI Art School in Rome and in 1997 in painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Rome, with Nunzio Solendo and Sandro Trotti. After teaching for several years in the capital, he devoted himself exclusively to painting and contemporary art research.

From 2013 lives and works in Fara in Sabina, at his studio “700Artecontemporanea”.

He has participated in group exhibitions, solo and international exhibitions in Italy and abroad exposing at some prestigious public spaces such as the Foundation Museum Venanzo Crocetti in Rome, the Stables of Aragona Palace in Vasto, CH, the DAP1 Gallery in Warsaw and Halle 50 at the DomagkAteliers in Monaco of Bavaria.

Ultimately exhibited at International Fairs in New York, Miami, San Diego, Santa Fe, and the Hamptons.

 

He took some aspects of popular culture, contaminated them with underground footnotes and applied them to an academic education. This way, Federico Pisciotta created a pictorical hybrid between technical perfection and decay of sign, strong provocation and intimacy of images. As a result, the logic connection among his images tends to loosen its functional rhythm in order to achieve a figurative trend, dysfunctional. It is set where nothing has, or must have, a meaning and everything seems to have a bias toward the absolute paradox. At first blush, we are looking at something not new. It seems that we got used to it thanks to the expressive-visual dynamics of the second half of the last century, considering also to what extent the pop avantgarde was paradoxical (considering the two aspects of the word: the logical one and the perceptual one). Thanks to that pop avant-garde images – every kind of images – became beyond-consumption products, fitting the “artistic consumption”. On the other hand, from another point of view, it supported the consumer aspect of art. But, as a loose cannon in the shrewd side of contemporary painting for what concerns the pop-reloaded, Pisciotta firstly recreated the iconographic value of each subject. After that, he reduce it single images-icons in order to spread the spicy taste of limited post-social frames, packed with politically-incorrect two-way aspects. He is just enough caustic, more confident than what is required by pop-addicted forces, used by our roman artist with wisdom, as Franco Angeli did years ago, the Italian example of the original pop collective imagination. We are at the crowning moment of consumerism which always more clearly connects with virtual reality. He finds these connections in scenes of video-games which become ordinary administration for who, like Pisciotta, is on the other side of the screen or of canvas. Maybe, did the act of pushing the play button, symbolically big and evident, become a vital necessity?

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